News 2016-12-06T14:13:04+00:00

News, Stories and Results for Students Discover

from the Your Wild Life blog

March 2017: The month you named a yeast. As humans, we give significance to something by giving it a unique name: whether this is our pets, our boats, our children, or our sourdough starters. It is how we distinguish the specific from the general. It is not just “a child,” it is our child, “Adrianne.” [...] [...]
Tue, Mar 07, 2017, Continue reading at the source
Educators: We'd love to have your students help us name our new yeasts. Here's some information to start the discussion with your students so that they can learn about the science of yeast. Introduction to Yeast Yeast are single celled organisms that are microscopic. They are actually fungi (like all mushrooms). They are a group [...] [...]
Tue, Mar 07, 2017, Continue reading at the source
This post is written by Clint Penick & Magda Sorger As the world's entomologists gather in Orlando this week for the International Conference of Entomology (ICE), we thought it a good time to revisit the famous Species Scape—the illustration showing that insects make up the largest portion of life on Earth. We scoured textbooks, scientific papers, and online databases to find the most current numbers for all species that have been described. There are new winners and new losers, but insects still make up nearly half of all species. The history of the Species Scape began when biologist Quentin Wheeler [...]
Sun, Sep 25, 2016, Continue reading at the source
**This is a guest post from postdoctoral researcher, Dr. DeAnna Beasley. Her research is NSF-funded by our Students Discover grant which partners scientists with educators to co-create citizen science projects and middle school lesson plans. The products of these partnerships can be found at StudentsDiscover.org.** This past summer I worked with middle school teachers in the Kenan Fellows Program and undergraduate students from Shaw University and North Carolina State University at the beautiful North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. Our goal was to develop a citizen science project that would engage middle school students in the classroom while providing data [...]
Mon, Sep 21, 2015, Continue reading at the source
On Thursday, March 5, eight middle school students from the classrooms of two 2014 Students Discover Kenan Fellows, Dave Glenn and Dayson Pasion, presented their research on wildlife camera-trapping at the North Carolina Technology in Education Society (NCTIES) conference in Raleigh. Over the last year, the students have participated in the eMammal citizen science project, deploying wildlife cameras in their schoolyard to capture animal activity. The students have been working in collaboration with scientists at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. At Burgaw Middle School in Pender County, Glenn's students have [...]
Mon, Mar 23, 2015, Continue reading at the source
Over the last few months, our first cohort of Students Discover Kenan Fellows have been busy in their classrooms piloting and refining the citizen science curricula they co-created with their scientist mentors from the NC Museum of Natural Sciences. If you dropped by their middle school classrooms, you would have seen students busy collecting and analyzing all sorts of new data. They've deployed camera traps in schoolyards to capture the secret lives of urban mammals. They've planted dandelions in different soil types and sampled the changes in microbes over time. They've scraped oily goop from each other's faces that contained [...]
Wed, Mar 11, 2015, Continue reading at the source
When I first met New Zealand native and science/artist Monica Peters, she was attending the Citizen Science Association meeting in San Jose, California. After her presentation she boldly stated, “Watch this space!” in reference to the growing citizen science initiatives in New Zealand. It was intriguing to learn about the efforts of citizen scientists in New Zealand communities to preserve their local natural habitats. She also stated that she had come from a design background, but has found herself in this scientific world. Wanting to hear more, I scheduled an interview and we got a chance to speak about her [...]
Fri, Mar 06, 2015, Continue reading at the source
Watching Out for Nesting Birds Look but don't touch. This was a lesson I learned early on as a young boy, staring intently along with my grandmother at a bird nest. Inside a shrub-like tree, a bowl of straw lay almost hidden. Within it, several nestlings, their mouths wide open, were awaiting their next meal. After a quick look, we hurried away, soon noticing that the mother robin returned with sustenance for her young. Folklore, of course, advises people to not harm bird nests, for doing so was commonly thought to bring bad luck (1). However, for many children, superstitious [...]
Mon, Feb 23, 2015, Continue reading at the source
Dr. Mette Olufsen found mathematics very easy in middle school and had an interest in biology. Yet, she never predicted that she would grow up to become a biomathematician, working in an interdisciplinary field that uses math to solve big biological questions. She describes a middle school experience that is very typical of Denmark in the 1970s: very free and focused on the importance of play and project-based learning, picking up three foreign languages, and adhering to Jante Law. Where were you in middle school? I was in Denmark. Actually, we didn't have middle school. We just had elementary school [...]
Fri, Feb 20, 2015, Continue reading at the source
Thanks to PBS Digital Studios and YouTuber Coma Niddy we can now add face mites to the list of subjects featured in a science parody music video! “You might not think you have mites. But you do! So face it, our bodies are a habitat!” Head on over to Coma Niddy's original post to read more about his experience meeting his face mites! [...]
Mon, Feb 16, 2015, Continue reading at the source